• The 1964 Civil Rights Bill Explained in 8 Minutes

    The 1964 Civil Rights Bill was the most significant piece of legislation in 20th century US history - this video explains the background to civil rights strife during the 1950s and 1960s, and outlines how the bill was eventually passed.

    published: 15 Aug 2014
  • The 1964 Civil Rights Act Explained: US History Review

    Take a trip through the essentials of the landmark Civil Rights Act of 1964. Perfect for struggling students, life long learners and cray cray on the internets.

    published: 12 Jun 2014
  • The Civil Rights Act Of 1964 Explained | This Day Forward | msnbc

    An edited and enhanced compilation of a Universal Newsreel and archival photos from the time period summarize basics of the 11 titles that comprised the Civil Rights Act of 1964. » Subscribe to msnbc: http://on.msnbc.com/SubscribeTomsnbc » Watch more “This Day Forward” here: http://bit.ly/DayForward About: msnbc is the premier destination for in-depth analysis of daily headlines, insightful political commentary and informed perspectives. Reaching more than 95 million households worldwide, msnbc offers a full schedule of live news coverage, political opinions and award-winning documentary programming -- 24 hours a day, 7 days a week. Connect with msnbc Online Visit msnbc.com: http://on.msnbc.com/Readmsnbc Find msnbc on Facebook: http://on.msnbc.com/Likemsnbc Follow msnbc on Twitter: http:...

    published: 04 Aug 2014
  • President Johnson and the Civil Rights Act of 1964

    President Johnson uses his unique political abilities and the legacy of JFK to pass the monumental Civil Rights Act of 1964 forever changing the political power of minorities across the entire nation.

    published: 27 Feb 2013
  • Civil Rights Legislation

    documentary on the Civil Rights Legislation

    published: 23 Mar 2012
  • How one piece of legislation divided a nation - Ben Labaree, Jr.

    View full lesson: http://ed.ted.com/lessons/the-legislation-that-birthed-the-republican-party-ben-labaree-jr You may think that things are heated in Washington today, but the Kansas-Nebraska Act of 1854 had members of Congress so angry they pulled out their weapons -- and formed the Republican Party. The issues? Slavery and states' rights, which led the divided nation straight into the Civil War. Ben Labaree, Jr. explains how Abraham Lincoln's party emerged amidst the madness. Lesson by Ben Labaree, Jr., animation by Qa'ed Mai.

    published: 11 Feb 2014
  • Civil Rights & Liberties: Crash Course Government #23

    Today, Craig is going to give you an overview of civil rights and civil liberties. Often these terms are used interchangeably, but they are actually very different. Our civil liberties, contained in the Bill of Rights, once only protected us from the federal government, but slowly these liberties have been incorporated to protect us from the states. We’ll take a look at how this has happened and the supreme court cases that got us here. Produced in collaboration with PBS Digital Studios: http://youtube.com/pbsdigitalstudios Support is provided by Voqal: http://www.voqal.org All attributed images are licensed under Creative Commons by Attribution 2.0 https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0/legalcode Want to find Crash Course elsewhere on the internet? Facebook - http://www.faceboo...

    published: 18 Jul 2015
  • September 1, 1960 - Senator John F. Kennedy - Statement on Civil Rights Legislation

    STATEMENT The time has come to set the record straight on civil rights legislation in this windup session of Congress. All the Senators joining me in this statement, as well as many others sharing these views, support effective civil rights legislation. We have not tried to match the 11th hour Republican tactic of substituting staged political maneuvering for effective legislation. Rather than yield to their efforts to play politics with a great moral question, we will take this issue to the American people. The Republican leadership of the Senate knows full well that under the parliamentary situation of these final crowded weeks - and in the political atmosphere of rancor that developed - no significant civil rights measure could have passed. This same political atmosphere has...

    published: 18 Apr 2009
  • The Civil Rights Movement: There’s No Equality without Enforced Rights- Learn Liberty

    On paper, blacks had equal constitutional rights by 1866. The Civil Rights Movement pushed to get those rights enforced. Prof. Fabio Rojas explains. Learn More: http://www.learnliberty.org/blog/emmett-till-was-murdered-61-years-ago-but-racism-lives-on/ Watch the full interview: https://www.facebook.com/LearnLiberty/videos/1431545433544144/ SUBSCRIBE: http://bit.ly/2dUx6wg LEARN MORE: Emmett Till Was Murdered 61 Years Ago, But Racism Lives On (blog post): The Emmett Till case is one of many in which the equal rights of African Americans were not enforced by the courts. http://www.learnliberty.org/blog/emmett-till-was-murdered-61-years-ago-but-racism-lives-on/ Why police brutality laws don’t seem to matter in America (blog post): Unfortunately, there are still many cases today of laws n...

    published: 09 Feb 2017
  • How the Civil Rights Act changed America

    Wednesday marks 50 years since President Lyndon Johnson signed the landmark Civil Rights Act, outlawing discrimination based on race, ethnicity and sex. Gwen Ifill is joined by Todd Purdum to discuss his new book, "An Idea Whose Time Has Come," which tells the story of how the legislation came to be.

    published: 03 Jul 2014
  • Civil Rights Act Of 1964

    (31 Dec 1964) Civil Rights Act Of 1964 Congress passes the most sweeping Civil Rights Bill ever to be written into law. Five hours after the House votes on the measure, President Johnson signs in into law before an audience of legislators and Civil Rights leaders at the White House. He calls it "a turning point in history" and uses a hundred pens to affix his signature. Following tradition the pens are distributed by the President to government leaders and other notables present including the Reverend Martin Luther King, Attorney General Robert Kennedy, Hubert Humphrey and Everett Dirksen. You can license this story through AP Archive: http://www.aparchive.com/metadata/youtube/6d798c392931d0f32636e495eca4d7c7 Find out more about AP Archive: http://www.aparchive.com/HowWeWork

    published: 21 Jul 2015
  • What is CIVIL RIGHTS ACT OF 1968? What does CIVIL RIGHTS ACT OF 1968 mean?

    What is CIVIL RIGHTS ACT OF 1968? What does CIVIL RIGHTS ACT OF 1968 mean? CIVIL RIGHTS ACT OF 1968 meaning - CIVIL RIGHTS ACT OF 1968 definition - CIVIL RIGHTS ACT OF 1968 explanation. Source: Wikipedia.org article, adapted under https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/ license. The Civil Rights Act of 1968 is a landmark part of legislation in the United States that provided for equal housing opportunities regardless of race, creed, or national origin and made it a federal crime to “by force or by threat of force, injure, intimidate, or interfere with anyone … by reason of their race, color, religion, or national origin.” The Act was signed into law during the King assassination riots by President Lyndon B. Johnson, who had previously signed the Civil Rights Act and Voting Rights...

    published: 24 Nov 2016
  • Coffee with Kenny: HB2 and Civil Rights Legislation

    In this edition of Coffee with Kenny, Kenny Colbert will be discussing House Bill 2 in North Carolina and civil rights legislation as it relates to Title VII of the Civil Rights Act of 1964.

    published: 13 Jun 2016
  • Civil Rights Act of 1964: Landmark legislation's 50th anniversary

    The Johnson Presidential Library will mark the anniversary of the Civil Rights Act of 1964 with four presidents. Bill Plante reports on the commemoration.

    published: 09 Apr 2014
  • The Jewish Lobby In Canada: Immigration, Communism, & The Civil Rights Movement

    Edited, written, and narrated by Disgruntled Leaf: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCPjlKwvj5jbvqH1hFtB9K9w Jews played a pivotal role in the transformation of Canada from a mostly white European to a multicultural, pluralist society. This is an examination of the Jewish Labour Committee as the central player during the Canadian civil rights movement in pushing for anti-discrimination and minority rights legislation for the purpose of in-group self-preservation. Sources: http://www.kevinmacdonald.net/CofCchap7.pdf#4, MacDonald, Kevin B. "Culture of Critique", 1998-2002. http://www.lltjournal.ca/index.php/llt/article/view/5218, "The Dresden Story": Racism, Human Rights, and the Jewish Labour Committee of Canada Menahem Kaufman, An Ambiguous Partnership: Non-Zionists and Zionists in Americ...

    published: 16 May 2017
  • Barry Goldwater explains his vote against the Civil Rights Act of 1964 - Firing Line (1966)

    Barry Goldwater explains his vote against the Civil Rights Act of 1964 on constitutional grounds - Firing Line with William F. Buckley (1966) www.missourah.com

    published: 26 Sep 2009
The 1964 Civil Rights Bill Explained in 8 Minutes

The 1964 Civil Rights Bill Explained in 8 Minutes

  • Order:
  • Duration: 8:26
  • Updated: 15 Aug 2014
  • views: 11112
videos
The 1964 Civil Rights Bill was the most significant piece of legislation in 20th century US history - this video explains the background to civil rights strife during the 1950s and 1960s, and outlines how the bill was eventually passed.
https://wn.com/The_1964_Civil_Rights_Bill_Explained_In_8_Minutes
The 1964 Civil Rights Act Explained: US History Review

The 1964 Civil Rights Act Explained: US History Review

  • Order:
  • Duration: 8:11
  • Updated: 12 Jun 2014
  • views: 25687
videos
Take a trip through the essentials of the landmark Civil Rights Act of 1964. Perfect for struggling students, life long learners and cray cray on the internets.
https://wn.com/The_1964_Civil_Rights_Act_Explained_US_History_Review
The Civil Rights Act Of 1964 Explained | This Day Forward | msnbc

The Civil Rights Act Of 1964 Explained | This Day Forward | msnbc

  • Order:
  • Duration: 3:01
  • Updated: 04 Aug 2014
  • views: 26629
videos
An edited and enhanced compilation of a Universal Newsreel and archival photos from the time period summarize basics of the 11 titles that comprised the Civil Rights Act of 1964. » Subscribe to msnbc: http://on.msnbc.com/SubscribeTomsnbc » Watch more “This Day Forward” here: http://bit.ly/DayForward About: msnbc is the premier destination for in-depth analysis of daily headlines, insightful political commentary and informed perspectives. Reaching more than 95 million households worldwide, msnbc offers a full schedule of live news coverage, political opinions and award-winning documentary programming -- 24 hours a day, 7 days a week. Connect with msnbc Online Visit msnbc.com: http://on.msnbc.com/Readmsnbc Find msnbc on Facebook: http://on.msnbc.com/Likemsnbc Follow msnbc on Twitter: http://on.msnbc.com/Followmsnbc Follow msnbc on Google+: http://on.msnbc.com/Plusmsnbc Follow msnbc on Instagram: http://on.msnbc.com/Instamsnbc Follow msnbc on Tubmlr: http://on.msnbc.com/LeanWithmsnbc The Civil Rights Act Of 1964 Explained | This Day Forward | msnbc
https://wn.com/The_Civil_Rights_Act_Of_1964_Explained_|_This_Day_Forward_|_Msnbc
President Johnson and the Civil Rights Act of 1964

President Johnson and the Civil Rights Act of 1964

  • Order:
  • Duration: 15:07
  • Updated: 27 Feb 2013
  • views: 29655
videos
President Johnson uses his unique political abilities and the legacy of JFK to pass the monumental Civil Rights Act of 1964 forever changing the political power of minorities across the entire nation.
https://wn.com/President_Johnson_And_The_Civil_Rights_Act_Of_1964
Civil Rights Legislation

Civil Rights Legislation

  • Order:
  • Duration: 11:28
  • Updated: 23 Mar 2012
  • views: 595
videos
documentary on the Civil Rights Legislation
https://wn.com/Civil_Rights_Legislation
How one piece of legislation divided a nation - Ben Labaree, Jr.

How one piece of legislation divided a nation - Ben Labaree, Jr.

  • Order:
  • Duration: 6:03
  • Updated: 11 Feb 2014
  • views: 1119650
videos
View full lesson: http://ed.ted.com/lessons/the-legislation-that-birthed-the-republican-party-ben-labaree-jr You may think that things are heated in Washington today, but the Kansas-Nebraska Act of 1854 had members of Congress so angry they pulled out their weapons -- and formed the Republican Party. The issues? Slavery and states' rights, which led the divided nation straight into the Civil War. Ben Labaree, Jr. explains how Abraham Lincoln's party emerged amidst the madness. Lesson by Ben Labaree, Jr., animation by Qa'ed Mai.
https://wn.com/How_One_Piece_Of_Legislation_Divided_A_Nation_Ben_Labaree,_Jr.
Civil Rights & Liberties: Crash Course Government #23

Civil Rights & Liberties: Crash Course Government #23

  • Order:
  • Duration: 7:56
  • Updated: 18 Jul 2015
  • views: 337092
videos
Today, Craig is going to give you an overview of civil rights and civil liberties. Often these terms are used interchangeably, but they are actually very different. Our civil liberties, contained in the Bill of Rights, once only protected us from the federal government, but slowly these liberties have been incorporated to protect us from the states. We’ll take a look at how this has happened and the supreme court cases that got us here. Produced in collaboration with PBS Digital Studios: http://youtube.com/pbsdigitalstudios Support is provided by Voqal: http://www.voqal.org All attributed images are licensed under Creative Commons by Attribution 2.0 https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0/legalcode Want to find Crash Course elsewhere on the internet? Facebook - http://www.facebook.com/YouTubeCrashCourse Twitter - http://www.twitter.com/TheCrashCourse Tumblr - http://thecrashcourse.tumblr.com Support Crash Course on Patreon: http://patreon.com/crashcourse CC Kids: http://www.youtube.com/crashcoursekids
https://wn.com/Civil_Rights_Liberties_Crash_Course_Government_23
September 1, 1960 - Senator John F. Kennedy - Statement on Civil Rights Legislation

September 1, 1960 - Senator John F. Kennedy - Statement on Civil Rights Legislation

  • Order:
  • Duration: 2:42
  • Updated: 18 Apr 2009
  • views: 4136
videos
STATEMENT The time has come to set the record straight on civil rights legislation in this windup session of Congress. All the Senators joining me in this statement, as well as many others sharing these views, support effective civil rights legislation. We have not tried to match the 11th hour Republican tactic of substituting staged political maneuvering for effective legislation. Rather than yield to their efforts to play politics with a great moral question, we will take this issue to the American people. The Republican leadership of the Senate knows full well that under the parliamentary situation of these final crowded weeks - and in the political atmosphere of rancor that developed - no significant civil rights measure could have passed. This same political atmosphere has also prevented action on a farm bill and on adequate minimum wage, housing, health care for the aged, and education bills. But progressive legislation has not been the aim of the Republican leadership. Their aim has been: (1) To block the minimum wage bill (which in its first year of operation would have raised the wages of an estimated 1 million Negro workers), the aged health care, housing, and education bills (which also would have meant major advances in the rights of our lower income and minority group members). A majority of Republicans voted against the minimum wage bill, all but one voted against social security health care for the aged and not one Republican on the House Rules Committee was ready to let adequate education and housing bills come up for final action. (2) To embarrass the Democratic Party, which can point with pride not only to a more meaningful platform but to the only record of legislative achievement in this field in over three-quarters of a century. (3) To conceal their own empty, negative record. If the majority of Republicans were sincere about the two token proposals they now press, they would not have supplied the votes that defeated them this spring,
https://wn.com/September_1,_1960_Senator_John_F._Kennedy_Statement_On_Civil_Rights_Legislation
The Civil Rights Movement: There’s No Equality without Enforced Rights- Learn Liberty

The Civil Rights Movement: There’s No Equality without Enforced Rights- Learn Liberty

  • Order:
  • Duration: 2:36
  • Updated: 09 Feb 2017
  • views: 4431
videos
On paper, blacks had equal constitutional rights by 1866. The Civil Rights Movement pushed to get those rights enforced. Prof. Fabio Rojas explains. Learn More: http://www.learnliberty.org/blog/emmett-till-was-murdered-61-years-ago-but-racism-lives-on/ Watch the full interview: https://www.facebook.com/LearnLiberty/videos/1431545433544144/ SUBSCRIBE: http://bit.ly/2dUx6wg LEARN MORE: Emmett Till Was Murdered 61 Years Ago, But Racism Lives On (blog post): The Emmett Till case is one of many in which the equal rights of African Americans were not enforced by the courts. http://www.learnliberty.org/blog/emmett-till-was-murdered-61-years-ago-but-racism-lives-on/ Why police brutality laws don’t seem to matter in America (blog post): Unfortunately, there are still many cases today of laws not being enforced in cases where crimes are committed against African Americans, such as in many police brutality cases. http://www.learnliberty.org/blog/why-police-brutality-laws-dont-seem-to-matter-in-america/ Should the government step in to outlaw discrimination? (blog post): What should libertarians think about discrimination laws? Mark Hall offers a solution that balances preventing discrimination with religious freedom. http://www.learnliberty.org/blog/should-the-government-step-in-to-outlaw-discrimination/ TRANSCRIPT: Fabio Rojas: The other thing, which I think is very important to realize that's a little bit different than civil rights, than in the way that many libertarians, or classical liberals think about civil rights, is that civil rights in that context, with Martin Luther King and his movement, was about enforcement of rights. Because, legally, people had equal rights as early as 1865 or 1866, when the 13th, 14th, and 15th Amendments of the Constitution were passed. Just to refresh, those are the Amendments that abolished slavery and gave people, black and white, every person in the United States, equal procedural protections under law. According to that law, you could not have a court for black people and a court for white people. Everybody was subject to the same court. Everybody was subject to the same police. Everybody was subject to the same everything. In theory, blacks and whites were equal, but in practice, it was the complete opposite. Because, what people would do is they would pass legislation in the states, sometimes in the Federal Government, that would enforce segregation in housing, schools, all kinds of areas of life. It wasn't enough to have a constitutional amendment saying you're equal, you needed various institutions in society to actually say, "Yes, a black person has as much right to be a doctor, to open a business on your street, and Main Street, downtown, without harassment." As with anyone else. My great example of this is the sad case of lynching. As you may or may not know from American History, there was a horrible wave of lynchings, which are these mobs of people that would pick up blacks, and hang them, and do horrible, horrible things to them. On paper, that was completely illegal, but the southern states, especially the southern states, refused to enforce this. For the Civil Rights Movement, there was definitely an abstraction notion of freedom. Amongst King's Branch, the Movement, there was a side of universal love, but what everybody agreed on was that the state was not enforcing your right to personal safety, your right to practice a profession, and your right to do these other things, which most people take for granted. That was the key issue for the Civil Rights Movement. LEARN LIBERTY: Your resource for exploring the ideas of a free society. We tackle big questions about what makes a society free or prosperous and how we can improve the world we live in. Watch more at http://www.learnliberty.org/.
https://wn.com/The_Civil_Rights_Movement_There’S_No_Equality_Without_Enforced_Rights_Learn_Liberty
How the Civil Rights Act changed America

How the Civil Rights Act changed America

  • Order:
  • Duration: 8:39
  • Updated: 03 Jul 2014
  • views: 1028
videos
Wednesday marks 50 years since President Lyndon Johnson signed the landmark Civil Rights Act, outlawing discrimination based on race, ethnicity and sex. Gwen Ifill is joined by Todd Purdum to discuss his new book, "An Idea Whose Time Has Come," which tells the story of how the legislation came to be.
https://wn.com/How_The_Civil_Rights_Act_Changed_America
Civil Rights Act Of 1964

Civil Rights Act Of 1964

  • Order:
  • Duration: 2:59
  • Updated: 21 Jul 2015
  • views: 4872
videos
(31 Dec 1964) Civil Rights Act Of 1964 Congress passes the most sweeping Civil Rights Bill ever to be written into law. Five hours after the House votes on the measure, President Johnson signs in into law before an audience of legislators and Civil Rights leaders at the White House. He calls it "a turning point in history" and uses a hundred pens to affix his signature. Following tradition the pens are distributed by the President to government leaders and other notables present including the Reverend Martin Luther King, Attorney General Robert Kennedy, Hubert Humphrey and Everett Dirksen. You can license this story through AP Archive: http://www.aparchive.com/metadata/youtube/6d798c392931d0f32636e495eca4d7c7 Find out more about AP Archive: http://www.aparchive.com/HowWeWork
https://wn.com/Civil_Rights_Act_Of_1964
What is CIVIL RIGHTS ACT OF 1968? What does CIVIL RIGHTS ACT OF 1968 mean?

What is CIVIL RIGHTS ACT OF 1968? What does CIVIL RIGHTS ACT OF 1968 mean?

  • Order:
  • Duration: 4:49
  • Updated: 24 Nov 2016
  • views: 956
videos
What is CIVIL RIGHTS ACT OF 1968? What does CIVIL RIGHTS ACT OF 1968 mean? CIVIL RIGHTS ACT OF 1968 meaning - CIVIL RIGHTS ACT OF 1968 definition - CIVIL RIGHTS ACT OF 1968 explanation. Source: Wikipedia.org article, adapted under https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/ license. The Civil Rights Act of 1968 is a landmark part of legislation in the United States that provided for equal housing opportunities regardless of race, creed, or national origin and made it a federal crime to “by force or by threat of force, injure, intimidate, or interfere with anyone … by reason of their race, color, religion, or national origin.” The Act was signed into law during the King assassination riots by President Lyndon B. Johnson, who had previously signed the Civil Rights Act and Voting Rights Act into law. Title VIII of the Civil Rights Act of 1968 is commonly known as the Fair Housing Act and was meant as a follow-up to the Civil Rights Act of 1964. While the Civil Rights Act of 1866 prohibited discrimination in housing, there were no federal enforcement provisions. The 1968 act expanded on previous acts and prohibited discrimination concerning the sale, rental, and financing of housing based on race, religion, national origin, and since 1974, gender; since 1988, the act protects people with disabilities and families with children. Victims of discrimination may use both the 1968 act and the 1866 act via section 1983 to seek redress. The 1968 act provides for federal solutions while the 1866 act provides for private solutions (i.e., civil suits). Titles II through VII comprised the Indian Civil Rights Act of 1968, which applies to the Native American tribes of the United States and makes many, but not all, of the guarantees of the Bill of Rights applicable within the tribes (that Act appears today in Title 25, sections 1301 to 1303 of the United States Code). A rider attached to the bill makes it a felony to "travel in interstate commerce...with the intent to incite, promote, encourage, participate in and carry on a riot". This provision has been criticized for "equating organized political protest with organized violence". Two developments revived the bill. The Kerner Commission report on the 1967 ghetto riots strongly recommended "a comprehensive and enforceable federal open housing law", and was cited regularly by congress members arguing for the legislation. The final breakthrough came with the April 4, 1968 assassination of Martin Luther King, Jr., and the civil unrest across the country following King's death. On April 5, Johnson wrote a letter to the United States House of Representatives urging passage of the Fair Housing Act. The Rules Committee, "jolted by the repeated civil disturbances virtually outside its door," finally ended its hearings on April 8. With newly urgent attention from legislative director Joseph Califano and Democratic Speaker of the House John McCormack, the bill (which was previously stalled) passed the House by a wide margin on April 10. The Civil Rights Act of 1968 prohibited the following forms of discrimination: 1. Refusal to sell or rent a dwelling to any person because of his/her race, color, religion or national origin. People with disabilities and families with children were added to the list of protected classes by the Fair Housing Amendments Act of 1988; gender was added in 1974 (see below). 2. Discrimination against a person in the terms, conditions or privilege of the sale or rental of a dwelling. 3. Advertising the sale or rental of a dwelling indicating preference of discrimination based on race, color, religion or national origin (amended by Congress as part of the Housing and Community Development Act of 1974 to include sex and, as of 1988, people with disabilities and families with children.) 4. Coercing, threatening, intimidating, or interfering with a person's enjoyment or exercise of housing rights based on discriminatory reasons or retaliating against a person or organization that aids or encourages the exercise or enjoyment of rights.
https://wn.com/What_Is_Civil_Rights_Act_Of_1968_What_Does_Civil_Rights_Act_Of_1968_Mean
Coffee with Kenny: HB2 and Civil Rights Legislation

Coffee with Kenny: HB2 and Civil Rights Legislation

  • Order:
  • Duration: 3:39
  • Updated: 13 Jun 2016
  • views: 167
videos
In this edition of Coffee with Kenny, Kenny Colbert will be discussing House Bill 2 in North Carolina and civil rights legislation as it relates to Title VII of the Civil Rights Act of 1964.
https://wn.com/Coffee_With_Kenny_Hb2_And_Civil_Rights_Legislation
Civil Rights Act of 1964: Landmark legislation's 50th anniversary

Civil Rights Act of 1964: Landmark legislation's 50th anniversary

  • Order:
  • Duration: 1:21
  • Updated: 09 Apr 2014
  • views: 774
videos
The Johnson Presidential Library will mark the anniversary of the Civil Rights Act of 1964 with four presidents. Bill Plante reports on the commemoration.
https://wn.com/Civil_Rights_Act_Of_1964_Landmark_Legislation's_50Th_Anniversary
The Jewish Lobby In Canada: Immigration, Communism, & The Civil Rights Movement

The Jewish Lobby In Canada: Immigration, Communism, & The Civil Rights Movement

  • Order:
  • Duration: 10:22
  • Updated: 16 May 2017
  • views: 1615
videos
Edited, written, and narrated by Disgruntled Leaf: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCPjlKwvj5jbvqH1hFtB9K9w Jews played a pivotal role in the transformation of Canada from a mostly white European to a multicultural, pluralist society. This is an examination of the Jewish Labour Committee as the central player during the Canadian civil rights movement in pushing for anti-discrimination and minority rights legislation for the purpose of in-group self-preservation. Sources: http://www.kevinmacdonald.net/CofCchap7.pdf#4, MacDonald, Kevin B. "Culture of Critique", 1998-2002. http://www.lltjournal.ca/index.php/llt/article/view/5218, "The Dresden Story": Racism, Human Rights, and the Jewish Labour Committee of Canada Menahem Kaufman, An Ambiguous Partnership: Non-Zionists and Zionists in America /WP-/W5 (Detroit 1991). 12-16,46 http://historyofrights.ca/encyclopaedia/social-movements/national-jewish-labour-committee-1936-1980s/
https://wn.com/The_Jewish_Lobby_In_Canada_Immigration,_Communism,_The_Civil_Rights_Movement
Barry Goldwater explains his vote against the Civil Rights Act of 1964 - Firing Line (1966)

Barry Goldwater explains his vote against the Civil Rights Act of 1964 - Firing Line (1966)

  • Order:
  • Duration: 1:11
  • Updated: 26 Sep 2009
  • views: 83532
videos
Barry Goldwater explains his vote against the Civil Rights Act of 1964 on constitutional grounds - Firing Line with William F. Buckley (1966) www.missourah.com
https://wn.com/Barry_Goldwater_Explains_His_Vote_Against_The_Civil_Rights_Act_Of_1964_Firing_Line_(1966)
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