• The 1964 Civil Rights Bill Explained in 8 Minutes

    The 1964 Civil Rights Bill was the most significant piece of legislation in 20th century US history - this video explains the background to civil rights strife during the 1950s and 1960s, and outlines how the bill was eventually passed.

    published: 15 Aug 2014
  • The Civil Rights Act Of 1964 Explained | This Day Forward | msnbc

    An edited and enhanced compilation of a Universal Newsreel and archival photos from the time period summarize basics of the 11 titles that comprised the Civil Rights Act of 1964. » Subscribe to msnbc: http://on.msnbc.com/SubscribeTomsnbc » Watch more “This Day Forward” here: http://bit.ly/DayForward About: msnbc is the premier destination for in-depth analysis of daily headlines, insightful political commentary and informed perspectives. Reaching more than 95 million households worldwide, msnbc offers a full schedule of live news coverage, political opinions and award-winning documentary programming -- 24 hours a day, 7 days a week. Connect with msnbc Online Visit msnbc.com: http://on.msnbc.com/Readmsnbc Find msnbc on Facebook: http://on.msnbc.com/Likemsnbc Follow msnbc on Twitter: http:...

    published: 04 Aug 2014
  • The 1964 Civil Rights Act Explained: US History Review

    Take a trip through the essentials of the landmark Civil Rights Act of 1964. Perfect for struggling students, life long learners and cray cray on the internets.

    published: 12 Jun 2014
  • Civil Rights and the 1950s: Crash Course US History #39

    You can directly support Crash Course at https://www.patreon.com/crashcourse Subscribe for as little as $0 to keep up with everything we're doing. Free is nice, but if you can afford to pay a little every month, it really helps us to continue producing this content. In which John Green teaches you about the early days of the Civil Rights movement. By way of providing context for this, John also talks a bit about wider America in the 1950s. The 1950s are a deeply nostalgic period for many Americans, but there is more than a little idealizing going on here. The 1950s were a time of economic expansion, new technologies, and a growing middle class. America was becoming a suburban nation thanks to cookie-cutter housing developments like the Levittowns. While the white working class saw their ...

    published: 22 Nov 2013
  • President Johnson and the Civil Rights Act of 1964

    President Johnson uses his unique political abilities and the legacy of JFK to pass the monumental Civil Rights Act of 1964 forever changing the political power of minorities across the entire nation.

    published: 27 Feb 2013
  • Civil Rights & Liberties: Crash Course Government #23

    Today, Craig is going to give you an overview of civil rights and civil liberties. Often these terms are used interchangeably, but they are actually very different. Our civil liberties, contained in the Bill of Rights, once only protected us from the federal government, but slowly these liberties have been incorporated to protect us from the states. We’ll take a look at how this has happened and the supreme court cases that got us here. Produced in collaboration with PBS Digital Studios: http://youtube.com/pbsdigitalstudios Support is provided by Voqal: http://www.voqal.org All attributed images are licensed under Creative Commons by Attribution 2.0 https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0/legalcode Want to find Crash Course elsewhere on the internet? Facebook - http://www.faceboo...

    published: 18 Jul 2015
  • Title VII of the Civil Rights Act

    The Civil Rights Act of 1964, signed into law by President Lyndon B. Johnson on July 2, 1964, is a landmark piece of civil rights and US labor law legislation in the United States that outlawed discrimination based on race, color, religion, sex, or national origin. Title VII is the section of the federal Civil Rights Act of 1964 that prohibits employment discrimination.

    published: 17 Jan 2017
  • How one piece of legislation divided a nation - Ben Labaree, Jr.

    View full lesson: http://ed.ted.com/lessons/the-legislation-that-birthed-the-republican-party-ben-labaree-jr You may think that things are heated in Washington today, but the Kansas-Nebraska Act of 1854 had members of Congress so angry they pulled out their weapons -- and formed the Republican Party. The issues? Slavery and states' rights, which led the divided nation straight into the Civil War. Ben Labaree, Jr. explains how Abraham Lincoln's party emerged amidst the madness. Lesson by Ben Labaree, Jr., animation by Qa'ed Mai.

    published: 11 Feb 2014
  • Barry Goldwater explains his vote against the Civil Rights Act of 1964 - Firing Line (1966)

    Barry Goldwater explains his vote against the Civil Rights Act of 1964 on constitutional grounds - Firing Line with William F. Buckley (1966) www.missourah.com

    published: 26 Sep 2009
  • President Lyndon Johnson - Speech on Voting Rights

    View the full speech here: http://millercenter.org/scripps/archive/speeches/detail/3386 Johnson states that every man should have the right to vote and that the civil rights problems challenge the entire country, not one region or group. The President asks Congress to help him pass legislation that dictates clear, uniform guidelines for voting regardless of race or ethnicity and that allows all citizens to register to vote free from harassment. March 15th, 1965

    published: 14 Jun 2008
  • History of the Civil Rights Act

    The Civil Rights Summit is now well under way at UT, commemorating the 50th anniversary of the passing of the Civil Rights Act of 1964. We decided to take a look back at some of the history surrounding the passage of this historic piece of legislation and it's far reaching implications. http://www.dailytexanonline.com

    published: 09 Apr 2014
  • Rand Paul On Civil Rights Act of 1964

    Kentucky Senate candidate Rand Paul, darling of the Tea Party and libertarians everywhere, explains his qualms about the signature piece of civil rights legislation, the Civil Rights Act of 1964.

    published: 20 May 2010
  • What is CIVIL RIGHTS ACT OF 1968? What does CIVIL RIGHTS ACT OF 1968 mean?

    What is CIVIL RIGHTS ACT OF 1968? What does CIVIL RIGHTS ACT OF 1968 mean? CIVIL RIGHTS ACT OF 1968 meaning - CIVIL RIGHTS ACT OF 1968 definition - CIVIL RIGHTS ACT OF 1968 explanation. Source: Wikipedia.org article, adapted under https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/ license. The Civil Rights Act of 1968 is a landmark part of legislation in the United States that provided for equal housing opportunities regardless of race, creed, or national origin and made it a federal crime to “by force or by threat of force, injure, intimidate, or interfere with anyone … by reason of their race, color, religion, or national origin.” The Act was signed into law during the King assassination riots by President Lyndon B. Johnson, who had previously signed the Civil Rights Act and Voting Rights...

    published: 24 Nov 2016
  • September 1, 1960 - Senator John F. Kennedy - Statement on Civil Rights Legislation

    STATEMENT The time has come to set the record straight on civil rights legislation in this windup session of Congress. All the Senators joining me in this statement, as well as many others sharing these views, support effective civil rights legislation. We have not tried to match the 11th hour Republican tactic of substituting staged political maneuvering for effective legislation. Rather than yield to their efforts to play politics with a great moral question, we will take this issue to the American people. The Republican leadership of the Senate knows full well that under the parliamentary situation of these final crowded weeks - and in the political atmosphere of rancor that developed - no significant civil rights measure could have passed. This same political atmosphere has...

    published: 18 Apr 2009
  • Civil Rights Act of 1964: Landmark legislation's 50th anniversary

    The Johnson Presidential Library will mark the anniversary of the Civil Rights Act of 1964 with four presidents. Bill Plante reports on the commemoration.

    published: 09 Apr 2014
  • How the Civil Rights Act changed America

    Wednesday marks 50 years since President Lyndon Johnson signed the landmark Civil Rights Act, outlawing discrimination based on race, ethnicity and sex. Gwen Ifill is joined by Todd Purdum to discuss his new book, "An Idea Whose Time Has Come," which tells the story of how the legislation came to be.

    published: 03 Jul 2014
  • What is CIVIL RIGHTS ACT OF 1866? What does CIVIL RIGHTS ACT OF 1886 mean?

    What is CIVIL RIGHTS ACT OF 1866? What does CIVIL RIGHTS ACT OF 1886 mean? CIVIL RIGHTS ACT OF 1866 meaning - CIVIL RIGHTS ACT OF 1866 definition - CIVIL RIGHTS ACT OF 1866 explanation. Source: Wikipedia.org article, adapted under https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/ license. The Civil Rights Act of 1866, 14 Stat. 27-30, enacted April 9, 1866, was the first United States federal law to define citizenship and affirm that all citizens are equally protected by the law. It was mainly intended to protect the civil rights of persons of African descent born in or brought to America, in the wake of the American Civil War. This legislation was enacted by Congress in 1865 but vetoed by President Andrew Johnson. In April 1866 Congress again passed the bill. Although Johnson again vetoed ...

    published: 23 Nov 2016
  • Civil Rights Act Of 1964

    (31 Dec 1964) Civil Rights Act Of 1964 Congress passes the most sweeping Civil Rights Bill ever to be written into law. Five hours after the House votes on the measure, President Johnson signs in into law before an audience of legislators and Civil Rights leaders at the White House. He calls it "a turning point in history" and uses a hundred pens to affix his signature. Following tradition the pens are distributed by the President to government leaders and other notables present including the Reverend Martin Luther King, Attorney General Robert Kennedy, Hubert Humphrey and Everett Dirksen. You can license this story through AP Archive: http://www.aparchive.com/metadata/youtube/6d798c392931d0f32636e495eca4d7c7 Find out more about AP Archive: http://www.aparchive.com/HowWeWork

    published: 21 Jul 2015
  • Civil Rights Legislation

    documentary on the Civil Rights Legislation

    published: 23 Mar 2012
  • Civil rights legislation drawing criticism

    Law professors say religious exemptions are broad ◂ RTV6 News brings you the best breaking news coverage in Indiana. News, information & entertainment from RTV6 - Central Indiana's ABC affiliate. Indianapolis, IN, USA theindychannel.com For more download the RTV6 mobile app: iPhone: http://bit.ly/iOS-rtv6 Android: http://bit.ly/rtv6play

    published: 18 Nov 2015
  • Rep. Viriginia Foxx (R-NC) claims GOP passed civil rights legislation in the 60s without Democrats

    On the House floor, 11/19/09

    published: 19 Nov 2009
  • GOP abolished slavery, passed Civil Rights legislation

    published: 03 Dec 2012
  • JFK vs. LBJ on Civil Rights

    In this clip, Walter P. Jones, author of "The March on Washington: Jobs, Freedom, and the Forgotten History of Civil Rights," points out differences between JFK and LBJ on civil-rights legislation. This conversation is part of the Miller Center's American Forum series. You can watch the entire conversation at http://millercenter.org/scripps/archive/forum/detail/6087.

    published: 25 Oct 2013
  • Disability Law, Policy and Civil Rights Movement

    published: 12 Jun 2012
developed with YouTube
The 1964 Civil Rights Bill Explained in 8 Minutes

The 1964 Civil Rights Bill Explained in 8 Minutes

  • Order:
  • Duration: 8:26
  • Updated: 15 Aug 2014
  • views: 15487
videos
The 1964 Civil Rights Bill was the most significant piece of legislation in 20th century US history - this video explains the background to civil rights strife during the 1950s and 1960s, and outlines how the bill was eventually passed.
https://wn.com/The_1964_Civil_Rights_Bill_Explained_In_8_Minutes
The Civil Rights Act Of 1964 Explained | This Day Forward | msnbc

The Civil Rights Act Of 1964 Explained | This Day Forward | msnbc

  • Order:
  • Duration: 3:01
  • Updated: 04 Aug 2014
  • views: 31216
videos
An edited and enhanced compilation of a Universal Newsreel and archival photos from the time period summarize basics of the 11 titles that comprised the Civil Rights Act of 1964. » Subscribe to msnbc: http://on.msnbc.com/SubscribeTomsnbc » Watch more “This Day Forward” here: http://bit.ly/DayForward About: msnbc is the premier destination for in-depth analysis of daily headlines, insightful political commentary and informed perspectives. Reaching more than 95 million households worldwide, msnbc offers a full schedule of live news coverage, political opinions and award-winning documentary programming -- 24 hours a day, 7 days a week. Connect with msnbc Online Visit msnbc.com: http://on.msnbc.com/Readmsnbc Find msnbc on Facebook: http://on.msnbc.com/Likemsnbc Follow msnbc on Twitter: http://on.msnbc.com/Followmsnbc Follow msnbc on Google+: http://on.msnbc.com/Plusmsnbc Follow msnbc on Instagram: http://on.msnbc.com/Instamsnbc Follow msnbc on Tubmlr: http://on.msnbc.com/LeanWithmsnbc The Civil Rights Act Of 1964 Explained | This Day Forward | msnbc
https://wn.com/The_Civil_Rights_Act_Of_1964_Explained_|_This_Day_Forward_|_Msnbc
The 1964 Civil Rights Act Explained: US History Review

The 1964 Civil Rights Act Explained: US History Review

  • Order:
  • Duration: 8:11
  • Updated: 12 Jun 2014
  • views: 28720
videos
Take a trip through the essentials of the landmark Civil Rights Act of 1964. Perfect for struggling students, life long learners and cray cray on the internets.
https://wn.com/The_1964_Civil_Rights_Act_Explained_US_History_Review
Civil Rights and the 1950s: Crash Course US History #39

Civil Rights and the 1950s: Crash Course US History #39

  • Order:
  • Duration: 11:58
  • Updated: 22 Nov 2013
  • views: 1694587
videos
You can directly support Crash Course at https://www.patreon.com/crashcourse Subscribe for as little as $0 to keep up with everything we're doing. Free is nice, but if you can afford to pay a little every month, it really helps us to continue producing this content. In which John Green teaches you about the early days of the Civil Rights movement. By way of providing context for this, John also talks a bit about wider America in the 1950s. The 1950s are a deeply nostalgic period for many Americans, but there is more than a little idealizing going on here. The 1950s were a time of economic expansion, new technologies, and a growing middle class. America was becoming a suburban nation thanks to cookie-cutter housing developments like the Levittowns. While the white working class saw their wages and status improve, the proverbial rising tide wasn't lifting all proverbial ships. A lot of people were excluded from the prosperity of the 1950s. Segregation in housing and education made for some serious inequality for African Americans. As a result, the Civil Rights movement was born. John will talk about the early careers of Martin Luther King, Thurgood Marshall, Rosa Parks, and even Earl Warren. He'll teach you about Brown v Board of Education, and the lesser known Mendez vs Westminster, the Montgomery Bus Boycott, and all kinds of other stuff. Crash Course World History is now available on DVD! Visit http://dft.ba/-CCWHDVD to buy a set for your home or classroom. Hey teachers and students - Check out CommonLit's free collection of reading passages and curriculum resources to learn more about the events of this episode. The Civil Rights Movement gained national attention with the murder of Emmett Till in 1955: https://www.commonlit.org/texts/emmett-till That same year, Rosa Parks refused to give up her seat on a Montgomery bus, beginning the Montgomery bus boycott: https://www.commonlit.org/texts/rosa-parks-and-the-montgomery-bus-boycott A young preacher named Martin Luther King Jr. gained national fame rallying support for the Montgomery bus boycott: https://www.commonlit.org/texts/martin-luther-king-jr The end of segregation also began in the South with the Showdown in Little Rock in 1957: https://www.commonlit.org/texts/showdown-in-little-rock Follow us! http://www.twitter.com/thecrashcourse http://www.twitter.com/realjohngreen http://www.twitter.com/crashcoursestan http://www.twitter.com/raoulmeyer http://www.twitter.com/thoughtbubbler
https://wn.com/Civil_Rights_And_The_1950S_Crash_Course_US_History_39
President Johnson and the Civil Rights Act of 1964

President Johnson and the Civil Rights Act of 1964

  • Order:
  • Duration: 15:07
  • Updated: 27 Feb 2013
  • views: 31969
videos
President Johnson uses his unique political abilities and the legacy of JFK to pass the monumental Civil Rights Act of 1964 forever changing the political power of minorities across the entire nation.
https://wn.com/President_Johnson_And_The_Civil_Rights_Act_Of_1964
Civil Rights & Liberties: Crash Course Government #23

Civil Rights & Liberties: Crash Course Government #23

  • Order:
  • Duration: 7:56
  • Updated: 18 Jul 2015
  • views: 391665
videos
Today, Craig is going to give you an overview of civil rights and civil liberties. Often these terms are used interchangeably, but they are actually very different. Our civil liberties, contained in the Bill of Rights, once only protected us from the federal government, but slowly these liberties have been incorporated to protect us from the states. We’ll take a look at how this has happened and the supreme court cases that got us here. Produced in collaboration with PBS Digital Studios: http://youtube.com/pbsdigitalstudios Support is provided by Voqal: http://www.voqal.org All attributed images are licensed under Creative Commons by Attribution 2.0 https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0/legalcode Want to find Crash Course elsewhere on the internet? Facebook - http://www.facebook.com/YouTubeCrashCourse Twitter - http://www.twitter.com/TheCrashCourse Tumblr - http://thecrashcourse.tumblr.com Support Crash Course on Patreon: http://patreon.com/crashcourse CC Kids: http://www.youtube.com/crashcoursekids
https://wn.com/Civil_Rights_Liberties_Crash_Course_Government_23
Title VII of the Civil Rights Act

Title VII of the Civil Rights Act

  • Order:
  • Duration: 5:30
  • Updated: 17 Jan 2017
  • views: 2094
videos
The Civil Rights Act of 1964, signed into law by President Lyndon B. Johnson on July 2, 1964, is a landmark piece of civil rights and US labor law legislation in the United States that outlawed discrimination based on race, color, religion, sex, or national origin. Title VII is the section of the federal Civil Rights Act of 1964 that prohibits employment discrimination.
https://wn.com/Title_Vii_Of_The_Civil_Rights_Act
How one piece of legislation divided a nation - Ben Labaree, Jr.

How one piece of legislation divided a nation - Ben Labaree, Jr.

  • Order:
  • Duration: 6:03
  • Updated: 11 Feb 2014
  • views: 1282545
videos
View full lesson: http://ed.ted.com/lessons/the-legislation-that-birthed-the-republican-party-ben-labaree-jr You may think that things are heated in Washington today, but the Kansas-Nebraska Act of 1854 had members of Congress so angry they pulled out their weapons -- and formed the Republican Party. The issues? Slavery and states' rights, which led the divided nation straight into the Civil War. Ben Labaree, Jr. explains how Abraham Lincoln's party emerged amidst the madness. Lesson by Ben Labaree, Jr., animation by Qa'ed Mai.
https://wn.com/How_One_Piece_Of_Legislation_Divided_A_Nation_Ben_Labaree,_Jr.
Barry Goldwater explains his vote against the Civil Rights Act of 1964 - Firing Line (1966)

Barry Goldwater explains his vote against the Civil Rights Act of 1964 - Firing Line (1966)

  • Order:
  • Duration: 1:11
  • Updated: 26 Sep 2009
  • views: 87812
videos
Barry Goldwater explains his vote against the Civil Rights Act of 1964 on constitutional grounds - Firing Line with William F. Buckley (1966) www.missourah.com
https://wn.com/Barry_Goldwater_Explains_His_Vote_Against_The_Civil_Rights_Act_Of_1964_Firing_Line_(1966)
President Lyndon Johnson - Speech on Voting Rights

President Lyndon Johnson - Speech on Voting Rights

  • Order:
  • Duration: 5:04
  • Updated: 14 Jun 2008
  • views: 195026
videos
View the full speech here: http://millercenter.org/scripps/archive/speeches/detail/3386 Johnson states that every man should have the right to vote and that the civil rights problems challenge the entire country, not one region or group. The President asks Congress to help him pass legislation that dictates clear, uniform guidelines for voting regardless of race or ethnicity and that allows all citizens to register to vote free from harassment. March 15th, 1965
https://wn.com/President_Lyndon_Johnson_Speech_On_Voting_Rights
History of the Civil Rights Act

History of the Civil Rights Act

  • Order:
  • Duration: 2:54
  • Updated: 09 Apr 2014
  • views: 198
videos
The Civil Rights Summit is now well under way at UT, commemorating the 50th anniversary of the passing of the Civil Rights Act of 1964. We decided to take a look back at some of the history surrounding the passage of this historic piece of legislation and it's far reaching implications. http://www.dailytexanonline.com
https://wn.com/History_Of_The_Civil_Rights_Act
Rand Paul On Civil Rights Act of 1964

Rand Paul On Civil Rights Act of 1964

  • Order:
  • Duration: 1:13
  • Updated: 20 May 2010
  • views: 5480
videos
Kentucky Senate candidate Rand Paul, darling of the Tea Party and libertarians everywhere, explains his qualms about the signature piece of civil rights legislation, the Civil Rights Act of 1964.
https://wn.com/Rand_Paul_On_Civil_Rights_Act_Of_1964
What is CIVIL RIGHTS ACT OF 1968? What does CIVIL RIGHTS ACT OF 1968 mean?

What is CIVIL RIGHTS ACT OF 1968? What does CIVIL RIGHTS ACT OF 1968 mean?

  • Order:
  • Duration: 4:49
  • Updated: 24 Nov 2016
  • views: 1540
videos
What is CIVIL RIGHTS ACT OF 1968? What does CIVIL RIGHTS ACT OF 1968 mean? CIVIL RIGHTS ACT OF 1968 meaning - CIVIL RIGHTS ACT OF 1968 definition - CIVIL RIGHTS ACT OF 1968 explanation. Source: Wikipedia.org article, adapted under https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/ license. The Civil Rights Act of 1968 is a landmark part of legislation in the United States that provided for equal housing opportunities regardless of race, creed, or national origin and made it a federal crime to “by force or by threat of force, injure, intimidate, or interfere with anyone … by reason of their race, color, religion, or national origin.” The Act was signed into law during the King assassination riots by President Lyndon B. Johnson, who had previously signed the Civil Rights Act and Voting Rights Act into law. Title VIII of the Civil Rights Act of 1968 is commonly known as the Fair Housing Act and was meant as a follow-up to the Civil Rights Act of 1964. While the Civil Rights Act of 1866 prohibited discrimination in housing, there were no federal enforcement provisions. The 1968 act expanded on previous acts and prohibited discrimination concerning the sale, rental, and financing of housing based on race, religion, national origin, and since 1974, gender; since 1988, the act protects people with disabilities and families with children. Victims of discrimination may use both the 1968 act and the 1866 act via section 1983 to seek redress. The 1968 act provides for federal solutions while the 1866 act provides for private solutions (i.e., civil suits). Titles II through VII comprised the Indian Civil Rights Act of 1968, which applies to the Native American tribes of the United States and makes many, but not all, of the guarantees of the Bill of Rights applicable within the tribes (that Act appears today in Title 25, sections 1301 to 1303 of the United States Code). A rider attached to the bill makes it a felony to "travel in interstate commerce...with the intent to incite, promote, encourage, participate in and carry on a riot". This provision has been criticized for "equating organized political protest with organized violence". Two developments revived the bill. The Kerner Commission report on the 1967 ghetto riots strongly recommended "a comprehensive and enforceable federal open housing law", and was cited regularly by congress members arguing for the legislation. The final breakthrough came with the April 4, 1968 assassination of Martin Luther King, Jr., and the civil unrest across the country following King's death. On April 5, Johnson wrote a letter to the United States House of Representatives urging passage of the Fair Housing Act. The Rules Committee, "jolted by the repeated civil disturbances virtually outside its door," finally ended its hearings on April 8. With newly urgent attention from legislative director Joseph Califano and Democratic Speaker of the House John McCormack, the bill (which was previously stalled) passed the House by a wide margin on April 10. The Civil Rights Act of 1968 prohibited the following forms of discrimination: 1. Refusal to sell or rent a dwelling to any person because of his/her race, color, religion or national origin. People with disabilities and families with children were added to the list of protected classes by the Fair Housing Amendments Act of 1988; gender was added in 1974 (see below). 2. Discrimination against a person in the terms, conditions or privilege of the sale or rental of a dwelling. 3. Advertising the sale or rental of a dwelling indicating preference of discrimination based on race, color, religion or national origin (amended by Congress as part of the Housing and Community Development Act of 1974 to include sex and, as of 1988, people with disabilities and families with children.) 4. Coercing, threatening, intimidating, or interfering with a person's enjoyment or exercise of housing rights based on discriminatory reasons or retaliating against a person or organization that aids or encourages the exercise or enjoyment of rights.
https://wn.com/What_Is_Civil_Rights_Act_Of_1968_What_Does_Civil_Rights_Act_Of_1968_Mean
September 1, 1960 - Senator John F. Kennedy - Statement on Civil Rights Legislation

September 1, 1960 - Senator John F. Kennedy - Statement on Civil Rights Legislation

  • Order:
  • Duration: 2:42
  • Updated: 18 Apr 2009
  • views: 4270
videos
STATEMENT The time has come to set the record straight on civil rights legislation in this windup session of Congress. All the Senators joining me in this statement, as well as many others sharing these views, support effective civil rights legislation. We have not tried to match the 11th hour Republican tactic of substituting staged political maneuvering for effective legislation. Rather than yield to their efforts to play politics with a great moral question, we will take this issue to the American people. The Republican leadership of the Senate knows full well that under the parliamentary situation of these final crowded weeks - and in the political atmosphere of rancor that developed - no significant civil rights measure could have passed. This same political atmosphere has also prevented action on a farm bill and on adequate minimum wage, housing, health care for the aged, and education bills. But progressive legislation has not been the aim of the Republican leadership. Their aim has been: (1) To block the minimum wage bill (which in its first year of operation would have raised the wages of an estimated 1 million Negro workers), the aged health care, housing, and education bills (which also would have meant major advances in the rights of our lower income and minority group members). A majority of Republicans voted against the minimum wage bill, all but one voted against social security health care for the aged and not one Republican on the House Rules Committee was ready to let adequate education and housing bills come up for final action. (2) To embarrass the Democratic Party, which can point with pride not only to a more meaningful platform but to the only record of legislative achievement in this field in over three-quarters of a century. (3) To conceal their own empty, negative record. If the majority of Republicans were sincere about the two token proposals they now press, they would not have supplied the votes that defeated them this spring,
https://wn.com/September_1,_1960_Senator_John_F._Kennedy_Statement_On_Civil_Rights_Legislation
Civil Rights Act of 1964: Landmark legislation's 50th anniversary

Civil Rights Act of 1964: Landmark legislation's 50th anniversary

  • Order:
  • Duration: 1:21
  • Updated: 09 Apr 2014
  • views: 798
videos
The Johnson Presidential Library will mark the anniversary of the Civil Rights Act of 1964 with four presidents. Bill Plante reports on the commemoration.
https://wn.com/Civil_Rights_Act_Of_1964_Landmark_Legislation's_50Th_Anniversary
How the Civil Rights Act changed America

How the Civil Rights Act changed America

  • Order:
  • Duration: 8:39
  • Updated: 03 Jul 2014
  • views: 1177
videos
Wednesday marks 50 years since President Lyndon Johnson signed the landmark Civil Rights Act, outlawing discrimination based on race, ethnicity and sex. Gwen Ifill is joined by Todd Purdum to discuss his new book, "An Idea Whose Time Has Come," which tells the story of how the legislation came to be.
https://wn.com/How_The_Civil_Rights_Act_Changed_America
What is CIVIL RIGHTS ACT OF 1866? What does CIVIL RIGHTS ACT OF 1886 mean?

What is CIVIL RIGHTS ACT OF 1866? What does CIVIL RIGHTS ACT OF 1886 mean?

  • Order:
  • Duration: 6:46
  • Updated: 23 Nov 2016
  • views: 1167
videos
What is CIVIL RIGHTS ACT OF 1866? What does CIVIL RIGHTS ACT OF 1886 mean? CIVIL RIGHTS ACT OF 1866 meaning - CIVIL RIGHTS ACT OF 1866 definition - CIVIL RIGHTS ACT OF 1866 explanation. Source: Wikipedia.org article, adapted under https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/ license. The Civil Rights Act of 1866, 14 Stat. 27-30, enacted April 9, 1866, was the first United States federal law to define citizenship and affirm that all citizens are equally protected by the law. It was mainly intended to protect the civil rights of persons of African descent born in or brought to America, in the wake of the American Civil War. This legislation was enacted by Congress in 1865 but vetoed by President Andrew Johnson. In April 1866 Congress again passed the bill. Although Johnson again vetoed it, a two-thirds majority in each chamber overcame the veto and the bill therefore became law. John Bingham and some other congressmen argued that Congress did not yet have sufficient constitutional power to enact this law. Following passage of the Fourteenth Amendment in 1868, Congress reenacted the 1866 Act in 1870. The author of the Civil Rights Act of 1866 was Senator Lyman Trumbull, who introduced the bill in the Senate. Congressman James F. Wilson summarized what he considered to be the purpose of the act as follows, when he introduced the bill in the House of Representatives: It provides for the equality of citizens of the United States in the enjoyment of "civil rights and immunities." What do these terms mean? Do they mean that in all things civil, social, political, all citizens, without distinction of race or color, shall be equal? By no means can they be so construed. Do they mean that all citizens shall vote in the several States? No; for suffrage is a political right which has been left under the control of the several States, subject to the action of Congress only when it becomes necessary to enforce the guarantee of a republican form of government (protection against a monarchy). Nor do they mean that all citizens shall sit on the juries, or that their children shall attend the same schools. The definition given to the term "civil rights" in Bouvier's Law Dictionary is very concise, and is supported by the best authority. It is this: "Civil rights are those which have no relation to the establishment, support, or management of government." During the subsequent legislative process, the following key provision was deleted: "there shall be no discrimination in civil rights or immunities among the inhabitants of any State or Territory of the United States on account of race, color, or previous condition of servitude." John Bingham was an influential supporter of this deletion, on the ground that courts might construe the term "civil rights" more broadly than people like Wilson intended. Weeks later, Senator Trumbull described the bill's intended scope: This bill in no manner interferes with the municipal regulations of any State which protects all alike in their rights of person and property. It could have no operation in Massachusetts, New York, Illinois, or most of the States of the Union. The next day, on April 5, 1866, the Senate overrode President Johnson's veto. This marked the first time that the U.S. Congress ever overrode a president's veto for a major piece of legislation. Formally titled "An Act to protect all Persons in the United States in their Civil Rights, and furnish the Means of their vindication", the Act declared that people born in the United States and not subject to any foreign power are entitled to be citizens, without regard to race, color, or previous condition of slavery or involuntary servitude. A similar provision (called the Citizenship Clause) was written a few months later into the proposed Fourteenth Amendment to the United States Constitution. The Civil Rights Act of 1866 also said that any citizen has the same right that a white citizen has to make and enforce contracts, sue and be sued, give evidence in court, and inherit, purchase, lease, sell, hold, and convey real and personal property. Additionally, the Act guaranteed to all citizens the "full and equal benefit of all laws and proceedings for the security of person and property, as is enjoyed by white citizens, and ... like punishment, pains, and penalties..." Persons who denied these rights on account of race or previous enslavement were guilty of a misdemeanor and upon conviction faced a fine not exceeding $1,000, or imprisonment not exceeding one year, or both.
https://wn.com/What_Is_Civil_Rights_Act_Of_1866_What_Does_Civil_Rights_Act_Of_1886_Mean
Civil Rights Act Of 1964

Civil Rights Act Of 1964

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  • Duration: 2:59
  • Updated: 21 Jul 2015
  • views: 5966
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(31 Dec 1964) Civil Rights Act Of 1964 Congress passes the most sweeping Civil Rights Bill ever to be written into law. Five hours after the House votes on the measure, President Johnson signs in into law before an audience of legislators and Civil Rights leaders at the White House. He calls it "a turning point in history" and uses a hundred pens to affix his signature. Following tradition the pens are distributed by the President to government leaders and other notables present including the Reverend Martin Luther King, Attorney General Robert Kennedy, Hubert Humphrey and Everett Dirksen. You can license this story through AP Archive: http://www.aparchive.com/metadata/youtube/6d798c392931d0f32636e495eca4d7c7 Find out more about AP Archive: http://www.aparchive.com/HowWeWork
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Civil Rights Legislation

Civil Rights Legislation

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  • Duration: 11:28
  • Updated: 23 Mar 2012
  • views: 597
videos
documentary on the Civil Rights Legislation
https://wn.com/Civil_Rights_Legislation
Civil rights legislation drawing criticism

Civil rights legislation drawing criticism

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  • Duration: 2:41
  • Updated: 18 Nov 2015
  • views: 91
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Law professors say religious exemptions are broad ◂ RTV6 News brings you the best breaking news coverage in Indiana. News, information & entertainment from RTV6 - Central Indiana's ABC affiliate. Indianapolis, IN, USA theindychannel.com For more download the RTV6 mobile app: iPhone: http://bit.ly/iOS-rtv6 Android: http://bit.ly/rtv6play
https://wn.com/Civil_Rights_Legislation_Drawing_Criticism
Rep. Viriginia Foxx (R-NC) claims GOP passed civil rights legislation in the 60s without Democrats

Rep. Viriginia Foxx (R-NC) claims GOP passed civil rights legislation in the 60s without Democrats

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  • Duration: 3:13
  • Updated: 19 Nov 2009
  • views: 16370
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On the House floor, 11/19/09
https://wn.com/Rep._Viriginia_Foxx_(R_Nc)_Claims_Gop_Passed_Civil_Rights_Legislation_In_The_60S_Without_Democrats
GOP abolished slavery, passed Civil Rights legislation

GOP abolished slavery, passed Civil Rights legislation

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  • Duration: 8:49
  • Updated: 03 Dec 2012
  • views: 35
videos
https://wn.com/Gop_Abolished_Slavery,_Passed_Civil_Rights_Legislation
JFK vs. LBJ on Civil Rights

JFK vs. LBJ on Civil Rights

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  • Duration: 2:21
  • Updated: 25 Oct 2013
  • views: 327
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In this clip, Walter P. Jones, author of "The March on Washington: Jobs, Freedom, and the Forgotten History of Civil Rights," points out differences between JFK and LBJ on civil-rights legislation. This conversation is part of the Miller Center's American Forum series. You can watch the entire conversation at http://millercenter.org/scripps/archive/forum/detail/6087.
https://wn.com/Jfk_Vs._Lbj_On_Civil_Rights
Disability Law, Policy and Civil Rights Movement

Disability Law, Policy and Civil Rights Movement

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  • Duration: 6:30
  • Updated: 12 Jun 2012
  • views: 11366
videos
https://wn.com/Disability_Law,_Policy_And_Civil_Rights_Movement
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